Let’s Start at the Very Beginning: How to Be a Psycadvocate®!

We have trained hundreds of psychologists and psychology students to meet with policymakers on Capitol Hill and advocate on behalf of the discipline of psychology. To stay informed of when the best time is to weigh in on policy issues impacting psychology, you can join our Federal Action Network and send your own message to your congressional delegation on a range of science, education or public interest issues. Don’t know where to start? A Psychologist’s Guide to Federal Advocacy is a valuable resource that provides an overview of the legislative process, APA’s federal advocacy efforts and how you can get involved.


Navigating the possibilities with a degree in psychology

What will you do with your psychology major?

If you find yourself wondering about this question, you are not alone. With more than 114,000 college students who graduated with a bachelor’s degree in psychology in 2012-2013 psychology is one of the most popular college majors behind business, health-related bachelor programs, social sciences and history.



Why Advocate?

Psychologists and psychological scientists have a rich history of being engaged in federal education policy development that the American Psychological Association continues to pursue across our advocacy. 


ADHD in Preschoolers: Overmedicated and Undertreated

An estimated 194,000 toddlers and preschoolers (age 2-5 years) in the United States have been diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and about 1 in 2 of them is not receiving the recommended treatment according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Yes, that is correct – about half of the young children diagnosed with ADHD are not receiving the appropriate treatment.


6 Things Parents Can Do to Boost Resilience in Kids

Parenting is hard work. Every parent or caregiver hopes that childhood and adolescence could be a carefree time in their kids’ lives. Unfortunately, this isn’t the reality for many children and teens. Kids without resilience are at risk for cognitive, emotional, physical and social issues as they grow up.


Year-by-Year Self-Care for Graduate Students: Third Year Students

For Third-Year Students: This year is all about knowing when to plug in and when to unplug. With two years under your belt, you can not only identify your strengths but are also likely to be able to identify the people and places that make you stronger. Make this year about capitalizing on the connections you’ve made, and don’t forget to add a little something new along the way!


Year-by-Year Self-Care for Graduate Students: Second Year Students

For Second-Year Students: One year into graduate school, you are likely to meet feelings of adjustment with recognition that you are (somehow) only getting busier. Here are some tips on how to manage your new-found groove while facing even newer challenges and tasks–you can do it! (View Part 1  of this series, dedicated to the first-year graduate school experience.)