How to stand out in your interview and job talk and more in this week’s news roundup!

How to stand out in your interview and job talk
(APA Monitor on Psychology)

Vital advice from psychology chairs and others who make hiring decisions.

Teaching Newsletter: How to Infuse Creativity in the Classroom
(The Chronicle of Higher Education)
Conventional wisdom suggests that teaching students how to be creative is a task best left to the arts and design. But faculty members from other fields are increasingly seeing the benefits of cultivating in their students the kinds of integrative and lateral thinking that creativity can foster. Two examples from psychology came to us in response to our recent request for your thoughts on this topic.

How a Focus on Rich Educated People Skews Brain Studies
(The Atlantic)

Neuroimaging studies have traditionally scanned a thin and unrepresentative slice of humanity—but that’s changing.

Are You at Risk for Secondary Traumatic Stress?
(Edutopia)
Teaching and caring for others—especially kids in trauma—can be difficult. Here are six strategies to help you take care of yourself.

Using social psychology to help first-generation and low-income students through college
(Brookings Institute)
Recent research in social psychology increasingly confirms what people from low-income and first-generation backgrounds have known and experienced for a long time: There’s more to the story than academic preparedness, financial aid, and uninformed parents.

A New Way for Ph.D.s to Plan Their Careers
(Inside Higher Ed)
Teresa Dillinger, Annie Maxfield and Sarah Peterson introduce ImaginePhD, a career-exploration and planning tool for doctoral students.

Hattie’s 2017 Updated List of Factors Influencing Student Achievement
(Evidence Based Teaching)

In this article, you will find Hattie’s 2017 updated list of factors influencing student achievement.

Educators Are More Stressed at Work Than Average People, Survey Finds
(Education Week)
Teachers are feeling especially stressed, disrespected, and less enthusiastic about their jobs, a new survey has found.

This Is the Number-One Cause of Stress for Americans
(Time)
More than half of Americans say that the present day is the worst period of American history that they can remember, according to a new survey of stress in the United States.

Dan Willingham on Reading Comprehension
(Education  Summit Video)
How do you read this sentence: “Time flies like an arrow.”?

Montessori preschool boosts academic results and reduces income-based inequality
(Science Daily)
Not only do Montessori children do better overall than those in conventional preschools, but Montessori preschools help low-income children to perform as well as wealthier children

Are You at Risk for Secondary Traumatic Stress?
(Edutopia)
Teaching and caring for others—especially kids in trauma—can be difficult. Here are six strategies to help you take care of yourself.

Peer Review by Whom?
(Inside Higher Ed)
Rand Paul wants to add two people to every federal peer-review panel evaluating research proposals, charged with looking for value to taxpayers. Science advocates say idea would politicize federal funding of research.

How Making Art Helps Teens Better Understand Their Mental Health
(KQED – MindShift)
“I realize how stigma is silencing, especially for adolescents. I want to be a role model for our students, which is why I began Creative Courage.”

The Midsemester Course Correction
(The Chronicle of Higher Education)
As it is in psychology, so it is in pedagogy. There’s very little benefit to rigidly adhering to your initial conceptions of a course.

GUEST POST: The Relationship between Affect and Cognition in Teaching and Learning (A Case Study)
(The Learning Scientists)
The affective affiliation a teacher has for a subject influences their teaching approaches.

Emotional intelligence: why it matters and how to teach it
(The Guardian)
Teaching young people skills such as active listening, self-awareness and empathy can equip them to succeed both academically and socially.

About the Author

Amanda Macchi, MPH
Amanda comes to APA as a recent graduate of the George Washington University’s Milken Institute School of Public Health. During her time at GW, Amanda studied global health, focusing on the challenges facing mental health in low-and middle-income countries. She received her undergraduate degree in marketing from Emerson College in Boston, Mass. In her free time, Amanda loves pyrography and collecting/learning about mid-century modern furniture.