Undergraduate Students


From Classwork to Applied Experience: Understanding the life of an Industrial-Organizational (I-O) Psychology Graduate Student

The Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology’s (SIOP) Visibility Committee recently wrote a blog introducing students to the rapidly growing field of Industrial-Organizational (I-O) Psychology. As a quick reminder, I-O psychologists study behavior in the workplace and are employed in various academic and organizational settings. Perhaps you are now seriously considering graduate school in this field, and while knowing the benefits of a future career in I-O, still have some questions about what life might be like as an I-O student. We can help with that!


How do college freshmen view the academic differences between high school and college?

Psychology teachers can serve an important role as mentors to their students in ways that can help students make a successful transition to college. By sharing information about the differences between the high school and college experiences, teachers can help students understand they will be adjusting to many changes, particularly in terms of expectations.



Review of “Whistling Vivaldi: How Stereotypes Affect Us and What We Can Do”

Author: Claude M. Steele, PhD
Publisher: W.W. Norton & Co.
Copyright year: 2011
ISBN: 978-0393339727

Since “Whistling Vivaldi” was first published in 2010, it’s likely you’ve read it or at least browsed through it at a bookstore. If not, it’s worth a read, both for its important content on the impact of stigma on the stigmatized and its accessible description of a two-decade research process. I’ve been aware of and have taught about the phenomenon of stereotype threat for some time, but I learned a lot about the pervasiveness of the phenomenon and also about the author, one of my favorite social psychologists, by reading this book.


It's hard to imagine a world without psychology

It’s Hard to Imagine a World Without Psychology

In a satirical piece entitled “Psychology Comes to a Halt as Weary Researchers Say the Mind Cannot Possibly Understand Itself,” the Onion reported, in a way that only the Onion can, that psychology as a discipline has come to its official end. Citing the current American Psychological Association (APA)’s President, they maintained that Nadine Kaslow declared “the APA, with its 134,000 members and 54 academic divisions, forever disbanded.”


Roadmap to Graduate School:  Finding Fit

It’s November, and chances are deadlines for graduate school are approaching fast.  But don’t panic – you’ve been following along with our blog, and you’re ahead of the curve (so to speak): In the first article we focused on why you want to go to graduate school, and in the second article we discussed how to research programs and narrow down your options.  In other words, you know where you want to go, and the way(s) to get there.


Doctoral degrees in psychology: How are they different, or not so different?

Doctoral degrees in psychology offer individuals preparation to conduct scientific research, professional practice or both. Most individuals receive either the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) or the Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) degree. Although each of these degrees is designed to engage students in deep knowledge and skills within a subfield of psychology, there are substantial differences in the type of training and career plans of individuals with these degrees. Finding the best-fitting program for an individual student begins with understanding these differences.